old broom

Being “born with a silver spoon in your mouth” has long been known to have advantages. Apparently, eating off a silver spoon also has its perks — it seems to make your food taste better.

That’s the word from a group of researchers who’ve been studying how cutlery, dishes and other inedible accoutrements to a meal can alter our perceptions of taste. Their , published in the journal Flavour, looks at how spoons, knives and other utensils we put in our mouths can provide their own kind of “mental seasoning” for a meal.

oldloves:

John Cazale & Meryl Streep in The Deer Hunter, 1978
Cazale had terminal cancer during shooting and all of his scenes had to be filmed first. Because of his illness the studio initially wanted to replace him but Streep and director Michael Cimino threatened to walk if they did.
“I’ve hardly ever seen a person so devoted to someone who is falling away like John was,” said Al Pacino. “To see her in the act of love for this man was overwhelming.”
(wikipedia)
  

oldloves:

John Cazale & Meryl Streep in The Deer Hunter, 1978

Cazale had terminal cancer during shooting and all of his scenes had to be filmed first. Because of his illness the studio initially wanted to replace him but Streep and director Michael Cimino threatened to walk if they did.

“I’ve hardly ever seen a person so devoted to someone who is falling away like John was,” said Al Pacino. “To see her in the act of love for this man was overwhelming.”

(wikipedia)

  

(via bbook)

nprfreshair:

Patricia Volk tells Terry Gross about how Elsa Schiaparelli changed women’s underwear:

Women’s underwear before World War II was kind of elaborate. It was usually made of silk and it had pleats and it had to be ironed. This was in France. There was no such thing as ‘drip dry’ and when the war started, most of the men went to the front and the women had to take jobs. There was gas rationing and so everybody had bicycles and you had to be licensed to ride a bike in Paris and in one year bike licenses tripled: it went up to 11 million. The way women dressed with these long skirts and this very elaborate underwear didn’t lend itself to riding a bike so Schiap changed panties completely. First of all, there was famine, so she got rid of the buttons and put elastic in the waist so that as you were losing weight, your panties would stay on. Then, she made them out of drip-dry material, so you didn’t need a maid to iron them … and she added a double-slung crotch and suddenly women could ride their bikes with a lot more freedom.

Image via Vintage Everyday

nprfreshair:

Patricia Volk tells Terry Gross about how Elsa Schiaparelli changed women’s underwear:

Women’s underwear before World War II was kind of elaborate. It was usually made of silk and it had pleats and it had to be ironed. This was in France. There was no such thing as ‘drip dry’ and when the war started, most of the men went to the front and the women had to take jobs. There was gas rationing and so everybody had bicycles and you had to be licensed to ride a bike in Paris and in one year bike licenses tripled: it went up to 11 million. The way women dressed with these long skirts and this very elaborate underwear didn’t lend itself to riding a bike so Schiap changed panties completely. First of all, there was famine, so she got rid of the buttons and put elastic in the waist so that as you were losing weight, your panties would stay on. Then, she made them out of drip-dry material, so you didn’t need a maid to iron them … and she added a double-slung crotch and suddenly women could ride their bikes with a lot more freedom.

Image via Vintage Everyday

thedailywhat:

Web App of the Day: Churnalism
Need a screening tool for signs of Churnalism? Head over to the Sunlight Foundation’s newly launched plagiarism checker app that can run any piece of text against its extensive database of U.S. press releases, RSS feeds and Wikipedia entries for possible overlaps.

thedailywhat:

Web App of the Day: Churnalism

Need a screening tool for signs of Churnalism? Head over to the Sunlight Foundation’s newly launched plagiarism checker app that can run any piece of text against its extensive database of U.S. press releases, RSS feeds and Wikipedia entries for possible overlaps.

futurejournalismproject:

Ireland’s Central Bank Issues Commemorative Coin to Celebrate James Joyce’s Ulysses, Misquotes the Text
The bank inserted an extra word (“that”) into a sentence taken from Ulysses. Not the biggest error, but still.
“While the error is regretted,” the bank said in a statement, “it should be noted that the coin is an artistic representation of the author and text and not intended as a literal representation.”
Meantime, some Joyce scholars think its fun. Via the Guardian:

Mark Traynor, manager of the James Joyce Centre, which is dedicated to promoting the author’s life and work, called the slip-up “unfortunate”, but said there was “certainly a humorous side to it too (no ‘flip side of the coin’ pun intended)”.
“For one thing, Joyce was an author who embraced errors. As Stephen remarks in Ulysses, ‘A man of genius makes no mistakes. His errors are volitional and are the portals of discovery’,” said Traynor. “So if there is any value in the little mistake by the minters it is that it has bred a new, unexpected narrative. What should have been a fairly mundane launch of a commemorative coin has suddenly reached a much wider audience than expected.”
It also just goes to show, Traynor added, “that – even after the cessation of copyright on Joyce’s major works – you still can’t reproduce a couple of sentences without causing a bit of scandal”.

Image: Front and back of the Ulysses commemorative coin.

futurejournalismproject:

Ireland’s Central Bank Issues Commemorative Coin to Celebrate James Joyce’s Ulysses, Misquotes the Text

The bank inserted an extra word (“that”) into a sentence taken from Ulysses. Not the biggest error, but still.

“While the error is regretted,” the bank said in a statement, “it should be noted that the coin is an artistic representation of the author and text and not intended as a literal representation.”

Meantime, some Joyce scholars think its fun. Via the Guardian:

Mark Traynor, manager of the James Joyce Centre, which is dedicated to promoting the author’s life and work, called the slip-up “unfortunate”, but said there was “certainly a humorous side to it too (no ‘flip side of the coin’ pun intended)”.

“For one thing, Joyce was an author who embraced errors. As Stephen remarks in Ulysses, ‘A man of genius makes no mistakes. His errors are volitional and are the portals of discovery’,” said Traynor. “So if there is any value in the little mistake by the minters it is that it has bred a new, unexpected narrative. What should have been a fairly mundane launch of a commemorative coin has suddenly reached a much wider audience than expected.”

It also just goes to show, Traynor added, “that – even after the cessation of copyright on Joyce’s major works – you still can’t reproduce a couple of sentences without causing a bit of scandal”.

Image: Front and back of the Ulysses commemorative coin.

artandsciencejournal:

Imaging Bacteria: Jon Sasaki’s New Photographic Work

Jon Sasaki’s recent photo-based work situates itself decisively at the nexus of humour, history, art and science. Three works in particular, Microbes Swabbed From a Palette Used By A.J. Casson, Microbes Swabbed From a Palette Used By Frederick Varley, and Microbes Swabbed From a Palette Used By Tom Thomson, all from 2013, embody Sasaki’s characteristic critical wit; the delicate abstract formations are bacterial cultures, grown in Petri dishes and born of microbes culled from paint palettes. Enshrined at the McMichael Canadian Art Collection, the palettes belong to late members of the Group of Seven.

A nod to the history and mythology of Canadian art and a persistent fascination with landscape, the microcosmic bacterial formations, while formally abstract, hint to painterly landscapes in their subtle tones, organic structures and tectonic shapes. The process of swabbing Group of Seven palettes speaks to a different mythology: that of the ‘Great Canadian painter.’ Is the use of such specific microbes, tied inextricably to the individual painter, an homage to the artist – or a clever critique of artistic genius? Regardless of critical intent, the inherent visual variety of the work affords each image a personality and the ability to act as a portrait of the artist whose palette microbes were used.

Sasaki’s photographs bridge the methodical and the mythological, re-imagining both the traditional Canadian landscape painting and the artist-worship trope. His employment of science-based methods in artistic practice works to undermine harsh disciplinary categories. Classification is cast off playfully; at the site of this betrayal, a rare experience of simultaneous wonder and amusement is afforded.

These and other new works by Jon Sasaki are on view at Jessica Bradley Gallery in Toronto from January 12 through March 16, 2013.

More of Sasaki’s work can be seen here.

-Natasha Chaykowski

(via wnycradiolab)

replicant:

Met Edith Windsor: The 83 year old woman who is fighting to strike down DOMA
With the Supreme Court hearing arguments for and against DOMA (the Defense of Marriage Act) in the case Windsor v. United States, I thought an info post about the woman who brought suit against the U.S. federal government was necessary. If the Supreme Court strikes down DOMA, her last name will live forever in constitutional law, but her life with the woman she loved for over 40 years, is really the heart of story.

Edith Windsor was a top IBM programmer in the 1960’s… in other words, bad-ass!
Windsor moved to New York City after divorcing her husband to work as a secretary while earning a master’s degree in mathematics from NYU. She also had a a fellowship at Harvard University, you know, just because she was awesome.

Edith Windsor didn’t know how to get a date with a lady
Like a lot of lesbians who move to a big city to be free, gay versions of themselves, Edith didn’t know exactly how to pursue a dating life (sound familiar, Tumblr?). She asked friends, “If you know where the lesbians are, please take me.” Her friends took her to a Greenwich Village restaurant called Portofino where she caught the eye of Thea Spyer, a psychologist. They danced. “We immediately just fit, our bodies fit,” said Thea.

Edith Windsor was engaged to Thea Spyer from 1967 to 2007
Thea proposed to Edith with a round diamond pin. She got down on one knee during a drive to the countryside in 1967. “She was beautiful,” Edie said in a recent interview. “It was joyful, and that didn’t go away.” At 45, Thea was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis and in 2007, the doctors gave Thea the grim news that she didn’t have much time left. Edith and Thea flew to Toronto and on May 22nd, 2007 they were married.

Edith Windsor’s case is about estate taxes, but about so much more
Despite being together for more than 40 years, in a relationship that most of us can only dream of and having a marriage that is legally recognized in Canada, when Thea passed away in 2009, Edith was saddled with a tax burden of $600,000 in state and federal estate taxes because her marriage isn’t legal in within the borders of the United States. This is one of the 1,138 benefits afforded to couples who are married in the United States. DOMA only recognizes a legal union between a man and woman and thus these benefits do not extend to same sex couples EVEN IF their marriage is legally recognized by the State. But in reality, this case is about so much more than just benefits and protections. Edith Windsor says, “The fact is, marriage is this magic thing. I mean forget all the financial stuff, marriage symbolizes commitment and love like nothing else in the world. And it’s known all over the world. I mean, wherever you go, if you’re married, that means something to people, and it meant a difference in feeling the next day.”

(via jetgirl78)

“‘We immediately just fit, our bodies fit,’ said Thea.”

That made me cry a little bit

(via braiker)